syrian tyrant

BBC Exclusive Interview With President Bashar al-Assad

Mr Assad denied that his forces had dropped barrel bombs indiscriminately on rebel-held areas, killing thousands of civilians, and dismissed as propaganda a statement by the UN that his government often blocks access to besieged areas for relief organizations.

He says he’s a patriot, defending his country, his enemies say his desire to stay in power has caused the catastrophe that has engulfed Syria in the last four years.

The Syrian dictator is profiting from the west’s lack of strategy, while the bloodshed he unleashes leads a country to ruin.

assad syria barrel bombs kill

In a wide-ranging interview with the BBC’s Middle East editor Jeremy Bowen, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad talks about the devastating civil war, the use of barrel bombs, the battle against Islamic State and al-Qaeda and relations with the US.

Below are excerpts from the interview recorded in the Syrian capital Damascus.

Q: Mr President, you’ve lost control over large areas of Syria, the Islamic State has emerged, there are perhaps 200,000 Syrians dead, millions have lost their homes. Has Syria become a failed state?

A: No, as long as the government and the state institutions are fulfilling their duty toward the Syrian people, [we] cannot talk about failed states.

Talking about losing control is something completely different. It’s like if you have [an] invasion of terrorists coming from abroad and the government is doing its job in fighting and defending its country.

Q: Can we briefly go back to when all this started in 2011 – you’ve said that there were mistakes made in the handling of those early demonstrations. Did you make mistakes yourself?

A: No, I never said we made mistakes in handling this. I always said that “anyone could make mistakes”, but there is a difference between talking about, or asking your question about policies and about practice.

If you want to go back to policies, we took the decision to fight terrorism from the very beginning. We took the decision to make dialogue on [a] national level, and I think both policies are correct. While if you want to talk about mistakes in practice, and that some mistakes [have been] committed towards some civilian, that happened from time to time, and some people were punished for these mistakes.

Q: You’ve talked about the influence of terrorism, as you call it, from the very beginning. But I was able as a reporter to go to some of those early demonstrations inside Damascus, in areas outside as well, and people there were not saying they wanted an Islamic Caliphate – they were saying they wanted freedom, democracy – not some kind of vision that IS have now for the country. Do you think you got it wrong?

A: You in the West called it that time, and some still talk about that period as [a] peaceful demonstration period.

And I will tell you that during the first few weeks many policemen were killed. Shot dead. I don’t think they were shot dead and killed by the sound waves of the demonstrators – so it was just a fantasy to talk about this… we have to talk about facts. From the very beginning the demonstrations weren’t peaceful.

Q: What about barrel bombs, you don’t deny that your forces use them?

A: I know about the army, they use bullets, missiles, and bombs. I haven’t heard of the army using barrels, or maybe, cooking pots.

Q: Large barrels full of explosives and projectiles which are dropped from helicopters and explode with devastating effect. There’s been a lot of testimony about these things.

A: They’re called bombs. We have bombs, missiles and bullets… There is [are] no barrel bombs, we don’t have barrels.

Q: On the fight against IS and al-Qaeda, the US and others have said you cannot be a partner in that fight. Would you like to be partner, would you like to join the coalition?

A: No, definitely we cannot and we don’t have the will and we don’t want, for one simple reason: because we cannot be [in] alliance with the country who support the terrorism… because we are fighting the terrorism.

Q: You’ve been very harsh in your criticism of the Saudis. Now the Saudis say they are against IS, they are frightened because IS do not want a royal family in Saudi Arabia. So isn’t it logical that they want them out? Why would they support them?

A: First of all, the source of this Islamic State ideology, and other al-Qaeda affiliated groups are the Wahhabi that have been supported by the royal family in Saudi Arabia. So just to say that “we do” and “we don’t”, it doesn’t matter. It’s what you do – what the action that you are taking in order to prove that what you are saying is correct.

Q: Let’s talk about American attitudes. Your departure from office is still the official American policy, but there are signs that they are softening… Do you believe that you are now being seen as part of the solution?

A: First of all, we don’t breathe through the Americans, we only breathe through our citizens. That’s how we breathe, this is first. So it’s not a lifeline for us.

Q: Syria has been very isolated, you’re under sanctions here, people can’t use credit cards, you’ve been cut off from a lot of the commerce of the world. You must surely welcome a situation which might get you back into the family of nations in a way that you haven’t been since 2011?

A: We’re not against co-operation with any country, we will never be. We didn’t start this conflict with the others. They started, they supported the terrorists, they gave them the umbrella.

It’s not about isolating Syria now, it’s about an embargo on the Syrian population, on the Syrian citizens. It’s different from isolation, it’s completely different.

Q: There’s the American military in the air above Syria and the Syrian Air Force. But there haven’t been any incidents between the two, no shots seem to have been traded, no planes have been shot down. That suggests to me surely that someone is talking to someone here?

A: That’s correct, that’s correct. But again there’s no direct co-operation…

Through a third party – more than one party – Iraq and other countries. Sometimes they convey message, general message, but there’s nothing tactical.

The Guardian view on Bashar al-Assad’s BBC interview: the lies of a tyrant

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/feb/10/guardian-view-bashar-al-assad-bbc-interview-lies-tyrant

Syria Assad Regime List of Barrel Bomb Attack on Civilians

Syria Assad regime barrel bombs attack on civilian area indiscriminately

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad has mercilessly dropped barrel bombs full of TNT, shrapnel on civilian heavily-populated areas of syria … Children little bodies were blown into pieces…innocent civilians were buried alive in their own home…

A barrel bomb is a type of improvised explosive device used by the Syrian Air Force during the Syrian civil war. They are typically made from a barrel that has been filled with High Explosives, with possibly shrapnel and/or oil, and then dropped from a helicopter. Due to the large amount of explosives that can be packed into a barrel the resulting detonation can be devastating. The Syrian regime often drops the bombs on urban areas leading to high civilian death tolls. There have been thousands of instances of the use of barrel bombs during the Syrian civil war, as reported by the news and activists, including:

2012

In August 2012, report of a barrel bomb being dropped on the Hamidiya neighborhood of Homs.
In August 2012, report of barrel bombs being dropped on Al-Qusayr.
In September 2012, a large number of people were killed and wounded when a barrel bomb was dropped on a residential district in Aleppo.

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2013

In late August 2013, barrel bombs were dropped on at least two areas of the city, including over a public park in Bab al-Nairab.
On 8 October 2013, a barrel bomb was dropped on the village of Bizabur, Idlib, just south of Ariha.
On 30 November 2013, a barrel bomb killed at least 26 people in Al Bab, Aleppo.
On 1 December 2013, a barrel bomb killed at least 20 people in Al-Bab, Aleppo.
From 15–24 December 2013, barrel bombs killed more than 300 people (and as many as more than 650 according to the Syrian National Council) in several districts of Aleppo.
On 26 December 2013, a barrel bomb killed at least 15 people in Azaz.
On 29 December 2013, a barrel bomb killed at least 25 people in Aleppo.

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2014
January

On 7 January 2014, barrel bombs killed an unspecified number of civilians in the Damascus suburb or Douma.
On 12 January 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 15 people in Al-Bab, Aleppo.
On 14 January 2014, barrel bombs killed an unspecified number of people in Darayya, Arbin and Zabadani, all in the province of Rural Damascus.
On 14 January 2014, a barrel bomb was dropped on the village of Inkhil in Deraa province.
On 18 January 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 60 people in Aleppo.
On 22 January 2014, barrel bombs were dropped in the central Hama province.
On 24 January 2014, barrel bombs were dropped on Darayya.
On 25 January 2014, barrel bombs killed 10 people when dropped on Aleppo’s outlying industrial city and the Sheikh Najjar districts.
On 28 January 2014, a barrel bomb killed 22 people in Aleppo.
On 29 January 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 62 people in the Maadi and Salhin districts of south Aleppo.
On 30 January 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 11 people in Darayya.

February

From 1–5 February 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 246 people in Aleppo.
On 8 February 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 20 people in Aleppo, and an unspecified number of people in Darayya.
On 9 February 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 11 people in Aleppo.
On 11 February 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 10 people in Aleppo.
On 12 February 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 38 people in Aleppo, while 31 people were killed in Daraa – mostly by barrel bombs.
On 16 February 2014, barrel bombs were dropped on Aleppo, Darayya, Khan al-Shih and several locations in rural Idlib.
On 17 February 2014, a barrel bomb was dropped on Masaken Hanano, Aleppo.
On 18 February 2014, barrel bombs were dropped in several parts of Syria, while a barrel bomb killed at least 18 people when dropped on the Palestinian refugee camp in Deraa.
On 23 February 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 12 people in Aleppo.

March

On 4 March 2014, barrel bombs were dropped on Yabrud.
On 5 March 2014, barrel bombs killed a number of people in Aleppo, Yabrud and Daraya.
On 6 March 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 13 people after being dropped on Aleppo and Yabrud.
On 7 March 2014, barrel bombs killed a number of people in Yabrud.
On 8 March 2014, barrel bombs destroyed many buildings including a mosque in Aleppo.
On 9 March 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 8 people, including a Canadian freelance photographer, after being dropped on Aleppo.
On 15 March 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 6 people after being dropped on Ras al-Maara and Yabrud.
On 22 March 2014, barrel bombs were dropped on Naima, Daraa Governorate.
On 24 March 2014, barrel bombs were dropped on Kesab and the Jebel Turkman.
On 26 March 2014, barrel bombs killed 20 people and wounded 40 others in the Anadan region of Aleppo.
On 27 March 2014, barrel bombs were dropped on Observatory 45, as well as Flitah, near the Lebanon border, where it killed 8 rebels.
On 31 March 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 31 people after being dropped on the Aleppo town of Maaret al-Artiq.

April

On 2 April 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 15 people after being dropped across the province of Aleppo and Deraa.
On 4 April 2014, barrel bombs killed about 50 people after being dropped on the Dalati Mosque and Dar al-Shifa Hospital of the Shaar neighborhood of Aleppo during peak times.
On 6 April 2014, barrel bombs caused much destruction in the Andana district of Aleppo.
On 10 April 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 88 people in the northern neighborhood of Aleppo.
On 11 April 2014, a barrel bomb, allegedly containing chemicals, was dropped on Kafr Zita.
On 12 April 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 11 people in the Anadan and Hrytan region of Aleppo.
On 20 April 2014, barrel bombs killed 59 people in Aleppo Province.
On 22 April 2014, 38 barrel bombs were dropped on rebel-controlled east Aleppo neighborhoods.
On 24 April 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 24 people when dropped on a vegetable market in Atareb, Aleppo.
On 26 April 2014, a barrel bomb killed at least 6 people in the town of Sarmeen, Idlib,[67] and at least 10 people in Lataminah, Hama.
On 30 April 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 25 children, after being dropped on an elementary school in Aleppo.

May

On 1 May 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 40 people in a busy market in Aleppo[70] and a barrel bomb killed 1 Syrian refugee and wounded four others in the remote border village of Tfail in east Lebanon.
On 10 May 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 46 people in eastern areas of Aleppo city.
On 11 May 2014, opposition forces accused the regime of contaminating a water supply in Aleppo after a barrel bomb struck a pumping station, one of two in the city.
On 21 May, barrel bombs destroyed many houses and claimed many lives in the town of Maaret al-Artik, Aleppo.
On 22 May, the Army had finally broken the siege of Aleppo prison after more than 100 barrel bombs were dropped during the final push to reach the prison.
On 27 May 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 43 people in Aleppo.
On 29 May 2014, barrel bombs claimed many lives in Darat Izza, Aleppo province.
On 30 May 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 20 people in Aleppo’s Bustan al-Qasr neighborhood.

June

On 2 June 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 22 people in Aleppo.
On 3 June 2014, barrel bombs injured dozens of people and damaged the Mosque of the Blacksmiths in Aleppo.
On 4 June 2014, barrel bombs targeted Aleppo, the town of Khan al-Shih, south of Damascus, several areas of Idlib province, and Morek, in Hama province.
On 5 June 2014, a mosque was hit by a barrel bomb at Qadi Askar district in Aleppo.
On 8 June 2014, a barrel bomb killed at least 7 people in the neighborhood of Tariq al-Bab, Aleppo.
On 14 June 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 8 people in Mayadeen, Aleppo, 13 people in Anadan, Aleppo province, and destroyed a mosque in Aleppo.
On 16 June 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 37 people in the Sukkari and Ashrafieh neighborhoods of Aleppo, and at least 3 people in a number of rural areas of Deraa province.
On 18 June 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 20 and injured at least 80 people, many seriously, in the refugee camp in the village of Shajra, 2 km (1 mile) from the Jordanian border.
On 21 June 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 11 people near the Ghouta district of Damascus.
On 22 June 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 9 people in the neighborhoods of Halak and Bab al-Nasr in Aleppo.
On 26 June 2014, barrel bombs killed as many as 49 people in areas in Aleppo and Hama province.

July

On 6 July 2014, barrel bombs killed 8 members of a single family in Da’el, Deraa province.
On 11 July 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 20 people in Aleppo.
On 16 and 17 July 2014, barrel bombs were dropped on the central town of Morek.
On 21 July 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 10 people in Al-Ansari neighborhood of Aleppo.
On 28 July 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 9 people in the Shaar district of Aleppo.

August

On 3 August 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 23 people in the Jabal al Akrad, Jisr al-Shughur and Najia districts of Idlib.
On 9 August 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 30 people and destroyed a mosque in the Maadi neighborhood of Aleppo.
On 10 August 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 24 people in Hama and Ar-Raqqah.
On 11 August 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 25 people in several districts of Aleppo and cut off water and electricity supplies.
On 13 August 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 17 people in the Bab al-Nairab district and al-Shaar area of Aleppo.
On 14 August 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 6 people in the Maadi neighborhood of Aleppo.
On 15 August 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 10 people in Aleppo and 14 people in Rastan.
On 22 August 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 20 people in Aleppo.
On 24 August 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 5 children in three villages in Daraa province.
On 30 August 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 5 people from the same family in the Hamra district of Aleppo.
On 31 August 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 42 children across Syria.

September

On 5 September 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 15 people in the Haidariyeh district of Aleppo.
On 8 September 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 7 people in the town of Tebet al-Imam near Hama.
On 15 September 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 15 people in Talbiseh.
On 18 September 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 15 people in Al-Bab.
On 20 September 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 8 people in the Arad Hamra, Al Haidarieh and Masakn Hanano districts of Aleppo.
On 26 September 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 5 people in al-Rastan and 9 people east of Aleppo.

October

On 1 October 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 23 people in Aleppo.
On 10 October 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 19 people in Daraa.
On 12 October 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 12 people in Binnish.
On 19 October 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 7 members of one family in the village of Sousan in northern Aleppo.
On 23 October 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 10 people in Daraa, and 15 people in the village of Tal Qarrah in the north of Aleppo.
On 26 October 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 12 civilians from the same family in the town of Busra al-Sham in Daraa province.
On 29 October 2014, barrel bombs killed as many as 75 civilians when dropped on the Abedin displaced persons camp in Idlib.
On 31 October 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 4 people in Rastan district in Homs.

November

On 6 November 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 12 people in the Shaar neighbourhood of Aleppo.
On 9 November 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 21 people in Al-Bab.
On 13 November 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 20 people in a primary school in Ras al-Ayn, al-Hasakah Governorate.
On 17 November 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 14 people near a bakery and a restaurant in Al-Bab.
On 18 November 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 14 people in Qabr al-Inglizi, near the villages of Huraytan and Kafr Hamrah.
On 28 November 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 20 people in Daraa Governorate.
On 30 November 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 12 people in Jasim, Daraa Governorate.

December

Notably, on 28 November 2014, a huge explosion occurred at the Syrian military airbase outside Hama. This was attributed to the complete destruction of the entire barrel-bomb making building on the airfield.

On 23 December 2014, barrel bombs killed at least 7 people in Safuhin, Maarrat al-Nu’man District, Idlib Governorate.
From 21-26 December 2014, according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, the Syrian regime dropped 193 barrel bombs across Syria.
On 25 December 2014, barrel bombs killed about 40 people in al-Bab and Qabaseen, near Aleppo.

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Article from:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Syrian_Civil_War_barrel_bomb_attacks

Bashar al-Assad
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bashar_al-Assad

Left Out in the cold: Syrian refugees abandoned by the international community

Syria Bashar al-Assad Regime:You want freedom! This is your freedom, Homeless and Stateless!

Registered Syrian Refugees: 3,217,906 (Dec 23, 2014)

The Gulf states– which include some of the world’s wealthiest countries – have not offered to take a single refugee from Syria so far. The complete absence of resettlement pledges from the Gulf is particularly shameful. Linguistic and religious ties should place the Gulf states at the forefront of those offering safe shelter to refugees fleeing persecution and war crimes in Syria.”

The lack of international support has had disastrous consequences with the five main host countries, who are currently hosting at least 95 per cent of Syria’s refugees, seriously struggling to cope. Turkey, Lebanon and Jordan have imposed severe restrictions on the entry of refugees in recent months leaving many trapped in Syria at serious risk of abuses by government forces or at the hands of the group that calls itself the Islamic State (IS) and other armed groups.

If a tiny country with a weak economy and huge debt like Lebanon can accommodate an increase of a quarter of its population others can certainly be doing more to help.”

Syria 3 1//2 years civil war creates 3 million refugees by Assad Regime

Read more articles:
The world’s pitiful response to Syria’s refugee crisis
http://www.amnesty.org/en/news/world-s-pitiful-response-syria-s-refugee-crisis-2014-12-05

The Historic Scale of Syria’s Refugee Crisis
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/10/16/world/middleeast/syrian-refugee-crisis-photos.html?_r=0

The 13.6 million include 7.2 million displaced within Syria – an increase from a long-held U.N. estimate of 6.5 million, as well as 3.3 million Syrian refugees abroad, 1.9 million displaced in Iraq and 190,000 who have left to seek safety.