aleppo

Bunker-buster bombs are used against civilians in Aleppo

Bunker-buster bombs are, the most powerful nonatomic bombs, are wiping out underground shelters in Aleppo. So how do they work?

Published on Oct 17, 2016

Bunker busters pass through concrete while remaining intact. They explode underground, creating shock waves that collapse buildings.

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Syria safe zones are still possible and necessary

By Dr. Azeem Ibrahim
Sunday, 15 January 2017

Aleppo
 
 
Now that Aleppo has fallen, many analysts would argue that the civil war in Syria will end. Yet I am not alone in arguing that the fighting will not end even if the war will be declared over. Fundamentally, the Assad regime or his Iranian and Russian allies will not become much less of a threat to the security of civilians in the rebel areas.

This is for several reasons. Chief amongst them is that Assad will want to completely break any notion that he can be opposed in the future, so he has to make an example of all civilian populations which have supported the uprising against him. And what is more, after the long and bitter war, the victorious elements will still have plenty of scores to settle with their enemies. And now they will have the opportunity to settle those scores with impunity.

 
 
Two most powerful actors

On top of that, the two most powerful actors in this conflict, Assad and President Putin of Russia, both have strategic reasons to want to keep the pressure on civilians. Assad hopes to push out of the country as many of the rebel populations so that he can consolidate his hold on Syria. And Putin also wants the migrant flow to continue, especially towards Europe.

The migration crisis so far has put European Unity under serious strain, and Putin will want to keep that pressure up. The European Union is more vulnerable than it has ever been in its entire existence, and for Putin now is the time to press home the advantage and hopefully destroy the entire edifice, giving Russia the geopolitical upper and on the continent.

 

“It is thus for both these reasons, humanitarian concern and self-preservation, that the West must make sure none of this comes to pass. The abuse of the Syrian people in Syria must stop. And in order to stop it, the first step is for us to guarantee their security in Safe Zones within the borders of their countries.”

 

It is thus for both these reasons, humanitarian concern and self-preservation, that the West must make sure none of this comes to pass. The abuse of the Syrian people in Syria must stop. And in order to stop it, the first step is for us to guarantee their security in Safe Zones within the borders of their countries.

This will require us to make greater commitments than we have been happy to do so far, but I would argue the alternatives are simply unacceptable. If Assad is let loose on his country without any resistence, we know full well where things will go: this is a man who ordered the use of chemical weapons and cluster munitions against his own people, and who has bombed hospitals, schools and humanitarian aid convoys. This is the same man, and the same regime, that before the conflict ran an extensive network of prisons where ordinary Syrians would routinely be “re-educated” through torture whenever they had any political opinion that diverged from the political line of the government. It is all too easy to imagine how this man and this regime would go about re-educating their rebelious population after such a long and brutal civil war.

And if that were to happen, most Syrians would simply have to seek refuge in other countries. Could we then blame them for wanting to come to Europe? Yet can Europe continue to absorb them in the current environment, where we are celebrating that only 46 percent of Austrians have voted for a neo-Nazi who promised to “secure the borders”? Where French politicians can scarcely out-do each other in anti-Muslim proclamations and dog-whistle racism for fear that if they do not the fascist Marine Le Pen will take the presidency next year? Where even Angela Merkel, seemingly the only sane adult still left in the room, has felt compelled to call for a ban on the burqa.

The how of implementing such Safe Zones has already been discussed extensively. We have a number of options that could be pursued. The main thing standing in the way is political will. The West does not have the stomach to do this because they think their electorates will not suffer any more military intervention in the Middle East. But will they be happier with the consequences if we do not intervene to establish these Safe Zones?

_____________________________________________________________
Azeem Ibrahim is Senior Fellow at the Centre for Global Policy and Adj Research Professor at the Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College. He completed his PhD from the University of Cambridge and served as an International Security Fellow at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard and a World Fellow at Yale. Over the years he has met and advised numerous world leaders on policy development and was ranked as a Top 100 Global Thinker by the European Social Think Tank in 2010 and a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum. He tweets @AzeemIbrahim.

Last Update: Sunday, 15 January 2017 KSA 13:49 – GMT 10:49
Article from: http://english.alarabiya.net/en/views/2017/01/15/Syria-safe-zones-are-still-possible-and-necessary.html

Women in Aleppo Choose Suicide Over Rape Rebels Report

Activists and rebels in the besieged city say mass executions have begun and children are burned alive as Assad’s Iranian- and Russian-backed forces move in.

By Michael Weiss, Roy Gutman, Alex Rowell, 12.13.16

Editor’s Note: This story has been updated throughout.

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Troops loyal to Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad and foreign militias under Iranian command swept into eastern Aleppo on Monday, recapturing nearly all of the city’s opposition-held areas and seizing the citadel of the Syrian revolution.

The triumphal takeover followed a day of intense bombing of houses and apartment buildings, destroying so many that it was impossible to determine the death toll. The neighborhoods of Bustan al-Qasr, al-Kallasa, al-Farod and al-Salhin in the Old City, as well as Sheikh Saed, in the southern district, are all now under regime control.

The United Nation’s top human rights official on Tuesday charged the U.S. and other countries with collectively wringing their hands in the face of the “wanton slaughter of men, women and children” in Aleppo and pleaded for the world to take measures to protect those fleeing the Russian and Syrian regime onslaught.

The U.N. had received credible reports of scores of civilians being killed either by intense bombardment or summary executions by pro-government forces. Zeid Ra’ad al Hussein, the High Commissioner for Human Rights, said in a statement.

“Dozens of bodies reportedly litter the streets of a number of east Aleppo neighborhoods, with residents unable to retrieve them due to the intense bombardment and fear of being shot,” Hussein said. He added that the U.N. had reports that at least 82 civilians, including 11 women and 13 children in four neighborhoods – Bustan al-Qasr, al-Ferdous and al-Kallaseh and al-Saleheen.

Decrying “the crushing of Aleppo, the immeasurably terrifying toll on its people, the bloodshed, the wanton slaughter of men, women and children, the destruction,” the Jordanian-born U.N. official warned, “We are nowhere near the end of this cruel conflict.”

“What can happen next, if the international community continues to collectively wring its hands can be much more dangerous.” Hussein said the slaughter in Aleppo could repeat itself in Douma, Raqqa and Idlib, referring to other opposition-held areas in the war-ravaged country.

“We cannot let this continue.”

The White Helmets, a volunteer rescue group, described Aleppo as being “like hell.” The streets and destroyed buildings “are full of dead bodies,” said a tweet by one of its volunteers. The rescue service was reported to be totally paralyzed by the assault.

The head of the group’s Aleppo branch, Ammar al-Salmo, said on Al Jazeera television that many old men died of the cold weather in eastern Aleppo.

More than 100 unaccompanied children were reported to be trapped in a building under heavy bombardment in eastern Aleppo, according to UNICEF, the U.N. agency responsible for child welfare said, quoting an unnamed doctor in the city, Reuters reported.

The head of the Aleppo local coordinating committee told regime forces had captured the remaining food supplies in eastern Aleppo and there are no functioning bakeries and no bread, the Turkish Anadolu news agency reported.

Syrian army spokesman Brig. Gen. Samir Suleiman countered that the U.N. was lying.

“These are false claims. The Arab Syrian army can never do this and we have never done it in our army’s history.” Yesterday, the official Syrian news agency SANA instead lay blame for atrocities in Aleppo on the rebels, alleging that eight people were killed and 47 were injured in regime-held areas after the opposition bombed them. Most of the victims were women and children, according to the agency.

Abdullah Othman, the head of the Consultative Council in the Levant Front, one of the largest rebel groups in Aleppo, said this morning that the opposition was still in possession of six neighborhoods, including Salaheddine, once the sight of some of the fiercest urban combat the Syrian civil war had witnessed.

“Last night we were able to reinforce our new defense lines and to build some blast walls on the new borders,” Othman told The Daily Beast today, speaking from the border town of Azaz. “Today the regime forces tried to sweep through our new defense lines but they haven’t been able to do so yet. But the problem is the barbaric, unprecedented bombardment and shelling that you can’t even imagine.”

Civilians were apparently crammed into whatever buildings still remain in the tiny quarters yet to be recaptured by the Assadists, but many were left outside in the streets, owing to lack of space. It is here, in broad daylight, Othman said, that men, women and children were being cooked alive by barrel bombs dropped right where they stood.

And those who survive the air raids could not be helped. “Women and children — their screams can be heard underneath the rubble. Unfortunately, there is nothing we can do to get them out. Everyone is panicking. There is great fear. Everyone can only think of himself, not about others.”

Yesterday, some residents who couldn’t take the bombardment anymore fled toward regime controlled areas, according to Othman.

“Seventy-nine of them were executed at the barricades. The rest — everyone under 40 — were taken to warehouses that look more like internment camps. They face an unknown fate,” he said.

“This morning 20 women committed suicide in order not to be raped.”

The last hope of the besieged rebels, most of whom seem to have withdrawn in the face of certain defeat, had been to receive reinforcements or resupplies from their counterparts in the southern and western suburbs. That option has now been foreclosed upon as these routes are completely interdicted by the regime.

Enab Baladi, a Syrian opposition news channel, said regime artillery attacked the six neighborhoods remaining in rebel hands with 40 shells and its ground forces – mostly Shiite militias under Iranian command – are attacking from four directions.

***

Activists and residents of the ever-dwindling opposition pocket, an urban islet of about five square kilometers and home to as many as 100,000 people, spent the last 24 hours signing off from social media, asking journalists to tell their story, and warning of their impending demise.

The Daily Beast was able to get in touch with Abdulkafi Al-Hamdo, a university teacher in the besieged city, on Monday evening. The brief conversation was as follows:

TDB: “I hope you’re safe.”

AA: “I don’t think I will be tomorrow.”

TDB: “Do you expect all the remaining besieged neighborhoods will fall by tomorrow?”

AA: “No. Except over the body of every civilian. I won’t surrender my body, and my wife, and my daughter to the Assad regime without defending them… I hope that you’ll tell everyone what I’m saying.”

On a publicly visible WhatsApp feed belonging to the Aleppo Siege Media Center, al-Hamdo was more fatalistic. “Doomsday is held in Aleppo,” he said. “People are running don’t know where. People are under the rubble alive and no one can save them. Some people are injured in the streets and no one can go to help them [because] the bombs are [falling on] the same place.”

Award-winning blogger and activist Marcell Shehwaro, a native of Aleppo, shared on Facebook a message from one of her most “peaceful” and least-sectarian friends. “No Marcell, don’t worry,” it read. “I will kill myself, I won’t let them arrest me.”

Lina al-Shamy, a 26-year-old woman speaking in fluent English, posted a video of herself to Twitter.

“To everyone who can hear me. We are here exposed to a genocide in the besieged city of Aleppo. This may be my last video. More than 50,000 civilians who rebelled against the dictator, al-Assad, are threatened with field executions or dying under bombing. According to activists, more than 180 people have been field executed in the areas the regime has recently retook control of by Assad’s gangs and the militias that support them. The civilians are stuck in a very small area that doesn’t exceed two square kilometers. With no safe zones, no life, every bomb is a new massacre. Save Aleppo, save humanity.”

Jouad al-Khateb had a similar message—one hesitates to call it valedictory— for the world. In Arabic, he told the camera: “Behind me is the Bustan al-Qasr neighborhood. Since last night up to the present moment, it is being bombed with every kind of weapon; vacuum rockets, missiles. The rockets have not stopped since last night. The people coming out of Bustan al-Qasr are telling me it’s become a city of ghosts. More than 20 families remain under the rubble across various districts.” The White Helmets were unable to reach any of the victims, al-Khateb added.

“My message to those watching: Just stop the waterfall of blood for us. We don’t want to leave the besieged areas. Just stop the waterfall of blood. It’s as if this has become very normal for the international community, you know, a rocket falls, 20 or 30 people are killed, under the rubble, they can’t pull them out—that’s a totally normal thing. In any case, there’s no space for graves to bury them in. Let them be buried under the buildings. I think this will be my last video, because we’ve gotten bored of talking, bored of speeches.”

Al-Khateb was interrupted by a loud groaning sound.

“That’s a barrel bomb,” he said, referring to one of the regime’s most notorious improvised munitions, a metal canister filled with high explosives and shrapnel, which are dropped indiscriminately from helicopters.

Another trapped resident, Ameen al-Halabi, boasted on Facebook, “I’m waiting for death or imprisonment by the Assad forces. I would rather die on the soil of my land than be arrested by their faithless militias.” Al-Halabi asked his friends to forgive him if this was the last message he wrote.

On several rebel chat forums on the popular messaging application Telegram, there were calls for the youth of Syria to wage “jihad” against the conquerors of Aleppo, if only to defend the honor of women who had allegedly been raped in the course of the Assadist blitzkrieg.

Whether or not that particular war crime has yet occurred in Aleppo—though human-rights monitors have documented mass rape in Syrian regime prisons since the start of the conflict—the call for holy war against the regime may yet take hold. For this reason, the CIA and Joints Chiefs of Staff earlier advised the Obama administration that the fall of eastern Aleppo, apart from being a humanitarian catastrophe, would also constitute a counterterrorism threat to the United States. The radicalization of survivors is all but a foregone conclusion.

***

Those already radicalized have had a remarkably auspicious week. While the regime was focused on reclaiming Aleppo, ISIS, or the self-proclaimed Islamic State, was able to completely retake another ancient Syrian city, Palmyra, which it had lost, to much international fanfare, last March.

Despite the gravity of the day’s events, and the many breaches of international law that led to the collapse of the rebel-held area, U.S. political leaders were slow to comment. President Obama has watched in silence as Russia and the Assad regime have committed what Secretary of State John Kerry called crimes against humanity, and Donald Trump has not once publicly mentioned the word “Aleppo” on his favorite social-media platform, Twitter, since being elected president of the United States a month ago. Kerry even meekly invited the Kremlin over the weekend to show “a little grace” in how it recaptured eastern Aleppo.

Meanwhile, the leading Syrian political opposition group charged Russia and the Syrian air force with the deaths of at least 150 civilians in what it described as a sarin gas attack on several villages in rural eastern Hama province Monday, and a further 15 in a missile filled with the nerve agent on the city of Raqqa on Monday.

Demanding an international investigation, the Syrian Coalition denounced what it called the “shameful international inaction, which has paved the way for the level of blatant criminality by the Assad regime and its allies.”

The gas attack, if confirmed, may have been intended to stop ISIS from linking up their forces in the Homs desert to those in the Hama desert area.

***

“The Holy Quran teaches that whoever kills an innocent is as—it is as if he has killed all mankind. And the Holy Quran also says whoever saves a person, it is as if he has saved all mankind.”

So did Obama tell a receptive audience in Cairo, in 2009, in a much-scrutinized maiden speech of his administration. (The second line in this sacred allusion, as it happens, is also the mantra of the now-helpless White Helmets.)

In a letter addressed to U.S. Congress, a copy of which was obtained exclusively by The Daily Beast, the Levant Front’s al-Othman beseeches legislators to “make one last effort to protect the civilians of Aleppo — to achieve where we have failed — by calling upon…Obama, to take strong and immediate measures for the people of Aleppo before the Assad murderers overtake us.”

But it’s likely too late. And so the president who came to office promising to repair the breach between the United States and the Islamic world, putatively caused by the war on terror and the invasion and occupation of Iraq, is now set to leave office having done little to stop to the slaughter or displacement of millions in Syria or the wholesale destruction of one of Islam’s most venerated cities.

—With additional reporting by Musab Al-Hamadee

Article from: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2016/12/12/last-rebels-in-aleppo-say-assad-forces-are-burning-people-alive.html?via=desktop&source=twitter

 

Liar of Syrian regime

assad_bashar_al_jaafari

Bashar al-Jaafari, Syria’s permanent representative to the UN, is trying to whitewash the regime through his claims that are not reflecting the reality, and his manipulations at the UN.

Article from: http://aa.com.tr/en/info/infographic/2908

Fighting for Aleppo

How Syria’s Forgotton Revolutionaries Rose Up “To Kill This Fear”

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Demonstrators chant slogans and hold Syrian flags during a protest against the Assad regime in the opposition-controlled Kafr Hamrah village of Aleppo, Syria, on March 25, 2016.

 

As Naji Jerf stepped out of an office building in the southern Turkish city of Gaziantep last December, a man walked up to him and fired two shots from a silenced pistol, striking Jerf in the head and chest and killing him instantly.

Jerf, 38, was a Syrian filmmaker and journalist who had become a popular activist during the revolution. A fierce critic of both the Assad regime and the Islamic State, he had received numerous death threats in the months before he was killed. Shortly after his murder, the Islamic State issued a statement claiming responsibility and Turkish authorities arrested three men in connection with the shooting.

Jerf is only one of the innumerable Syrian revolutionary activists who have lost their lives over the past five years. An editor and documentarian, he helped train a generation of young Syrians to continue the fight for democracy in their country. But his story, and the stories of those like him who continue the spirit of the 2011 uprising, rarely register in broader narratives of the conflict. For all they have sacrificed, their struggles have gone largely ignored, in a framing of the conflict that has been convenient for the Assad government.

Leila Shami, co-author of the book “Burning Country: Syrians in Revolution and War,” told me, “The Syrian government has taken huge efforts to frame the conflict as one solely between themselves and extremist groups. People are not aware that there is a third option in Syria, that there are many Syrians from a wide range of backgrounds who are still fighting for the original goals of the revolution.”

Shami added, “Syria has had so many heroes, but people often don’t know who they are.”

Syrian students outside the damaged building of the University of Aleppo before sitting their exams on January 29, 2013, after the institution re-opened following an explosion earlier in the month, in northern Syria's city of Aleppo. The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights confirmed the blast on January 15, which caused a number of causalities, but said its origin was unclear. AFP PHOTO / STR (Photo credit should read -/AFP/Getty Images)

Syrian students stand outside a damaged building at the University of Aleppo on Jan. 29, 2013, after the institution re-opened following an explosion earlier in the month. Photo: AFP/Getty Images

Khalifa al-Khadr was one of those whose lives Naji Jerf had touched. A student at Aleppo University when the war began, he now belongs to a new generation of writers and journalists committed to carrying on the goals of the revolution. Last week in Gaziantep, on the Turkish-Syrian border, Khadr sat drinking tea at a bustling outdoor restaurant, occasionally rising to greet other young Syrians who now also call this Turkish city home.

“When all this started, we were mostly too young to have any kind of ideology,” Khadr told me. “The reason we rose up was to just kill fear. To kill this fear that we had all been living under as a society.”

Khadr looked younger than his 23 years. He wore glasses, an orange jacket, and a beige scarf wrapped around his neck. The revolution had begun when he was only 17. It came to consume every aspect of his life and worldview. Despite his youthful appearance, he spoke with the serious intensity of someone who had come of age during war. On his cellphone, the background photo was a picture of a young Syrian girl killed in a government bombardment of the city of Idlib.

khalifa-al-khadr-article

Khalifa al-Khadr in a photo taken on May 30, 2015. Photo: Khalifa al-Khadr/Facebook

“When protests began at Aleppo University several years ago, we held them for only 15 or 20 minutes, just to show solidarity with other cities under attack and then disperse before the security forces came for us,” he recalled. “We were not calling for Assad to fall, just to remove the emergency laws and allow some space for democracy in the country.”When the government met those protests with brutal violence, Khadr saw sentiments harden among his fellow students. Now they realized that the government would choose force over incremental reform, and they began calling for bringing down the regime. Some spoke of taking up arms in self-defense.

 

 

 

As it turned out, they wouldn’t have to. In the summer of 2012, rebel fighters from surrounding villages swept into Aleppo and captured several key districts from government control. The people of Aleppo were divided in their response to the rebels’ arrival. Some wealthy residents were uneasy with the influx of poor, rural fighters. Even among those who had supported the uprising, there were divisions and concerns. Khadr didn’t share them. “I was excited,” he told me. “I felt like we were about to be part of something that was going to free the country.”

But as the war ground into a stalemate, many people fled Aleppo, and then Syria itself. Khadr was among the activists who stayed. He was continuing the revolution by other means: building an archive of photos and videos to document developments in opposition-held areas, and writing about his own experiences and observations of the uprising. In one passage of a longer reminiscence, he wrote about a childhood friend who took part in the revolution only to later turn away from it by joining the militant group the Islamic State:

A choke comes between memory and the bitter reality. The choke kills me and forbids me from mourning him. If I were an armed fighter, I would have killed him the minute I saw him on the battlefield, to save his soul. To prevent him from infecting others, to prevent his soul from sinking into others’ blood.

I won’t mourn your deeds, even if the one you killed was my own father. As you have loyalties of your own, I have loyalty to our revolution, more sacred than yours.

Syrian protesters gather in demonstration against the regime in the Bustan al-Qasr neighbourhood of the northern city of Aleppo on November 9, 2012. Syria President Bashar al-Assad said his future could only be decided at the ballot box and denied Syria was in a state of civil war, despite fresh attacks and heavy fighting near the Turkish border. AFP PHOTO/ACHILLEAS ZAVALLIS (Photo credit should read ACHILLEAS ZAVALLIS/AFP/Getty Images)

Syrian protesters gather to demonstrate against the Assad regime in the Bustan al-Qasr neighborhood of the northern city of Aleppo on Nov. 9, 2012. Photo: Achilleas Zavallis/AFP/Getty Images

The culture of the revolution had imprinted itself indelibly on Khadr’s personality, as it had on those of many other young Syrians. Creating a “Free Syria” — free from oppression and upholding basic rights like freedom of expression and equal treatment under the law — had become the guiding purpose of his life. Like many others, Khadr felt compelled both to write and to seek out like-minded young Syrians.It was through social media that he first met Naji Jerf three years ago. Khadr was engaged in a debate with other young Syrian activists on Facebook when Jerf, known to many of them as the editor of the Syrian revolutionary news outlet Hentah, “liked” his status, part of a Facebook conversation that had begun around the quote “Man does not live on bread alone.” The two began messaging and Jerf invited Khadr to take part in a media workshop he had arranged for young activists in southern Turkey, where Jerf was then based.

Jerf became a mentor and adviser to Khadr, encouraging him to develop his writing and publishing his articles periodically on Hentah. While Khadr lived between relatives’ and friends’ homes in different areas of opposition-held Syria, he would occasionally cross the border to Gaziantep to meet with Jerf and other activists. In the relative calm of Turkey, they would spend days talking and reflecting on the future of their country — discussions that helped shape the nascent worldviews of Khadr and the other young activists.

“Syrians have tried secularism, nationalism, Islamism, and they have all failed in various ways,” Khadr told me. “The reality is that it doesn’t matter what the orientation of the government is per se. What matters is that the ruling system respects the rights of citizens and protects them from injustice.”

Under the Assad regime, Syria had become a police state whose prisons were notorious for torture, murder, and indefinite detention. Many activists, including Ghiath Matar, known as “Syria’s Gandhi,” and the Syrian anarchist philosopher Omar Aziz, had lost their lives in Syria’s torturous detention facilities.

“Even before the revolution, we all grew up hearing stories of people who disappeared, we knew the fear this created,” Khadr reflected. He told me that now he dreams of a country with “no prisons” — a country where the all-encompassing fear that characterized Baathist rule is finally removed.

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The grave of Naji Jerf, a Syrian filmmaker and journalist killed in Gaziantep, Turkey, last December. Photo: Khalifa al-Khadr/Facebook

 

The outside narrative of the Syrian conflict, which focuses exclusively on the actions of armed groups and states, has minimized or excluded a significant dimension. The revolution fostered a Syrian civil society that continues to fight for the future of the country. Across cities and small towns in Syria, in areas that have slipped from the central government’s grip and are free of Islamic State control, local councils operate that provide a semblance of democratic rule in a country that, in its modern history, has known only totalitarianism. A huge array of new independent newspapers, radio stations, and video production companies has arisen, giving voice to a people who had long been either silenced or forced to consume Soviet-style Baathist propaganda. Khadr’s life, like the lives of many other Syrians of his generation, has been irreversibly transformed by the events of the revolution. Though he is still young, he exudes a brash confidence and poise. “All my old friends from before, when I was just a student, we lost touch and don’t talk anymore,” he said, fingering a string of beads wrapped around his fingers. “Everyone who is a friend to me today, they are people I shared experiences with during the revolution.”

Khadr was back in Syria last December when he received the message informing him that Naji Jerf had been murdered. In a Facebook post that day, Syrian journalist Rami Jarrah lamented that people like Jerf — Syrian civil revolutionaries who had given their lives for the freedom of the country — had been effectively airbrushed out of history.

“Syrians who have dedicated so much for principle and stood against tyranny and extremism [receive] no real recognition,” Jarrah wrote. “This mess of misinformation says that there are two sides fighting (Assad and ISIS) with little mention of those that oppose both wrongs. Those like Naji.”

In Muslim societies, funerals are typically held within a few days of death. Despite Khadr’s wishes, he could not cross the border back to Turkey in time to attend his friend’s farewell.

“Death has a different meaning in different cultures. At the beginning you mourn, but then, when so many begin to die, you have to find a way to stop mourning them and just keep going,” he told me, emotion slowly creeping into his voice.

“When I think of Naji now, I remember the things he taught me and I say: Your memory is my path.”

Top photo: Demonstrators chant slogans and hold Syrian flags during a protest against the Assad regime in the opposition-controlled Kafr Hamrah village of Aleppo, Syria, on March 25, 2016.

Contact the author:

Murtaza Hussainmurtaza.hussain@theintercept.com@mazmhussain

Article from: https://theintercept.com/2016/10/23/how-syrias-forgotten-revolutionaries-rose-up-to-kill-this-fear/

 

Inside Aleppo: A new life in a deadly city

Published on Aug 18, 2016

Warning: this film contains graphic and distressing scenes inside the operating theatre.

The film-maker Waad Al Katib is in Aleppo, to document the suffering of its people caught up in the siege and under regular bombardment.

This film focuses on one woman – Mayissa – who, at nine months’ pregnant, was injured in one of those airstrikes. But it features, too, the phenomenal dedication and skill of the ill-equipped doctors and nurses in the city’s hospitals – who battle to save both her, and her baby’s life.

LIVE FROM THE BESIEGED CITY OF ALEPPO SYRIA

LIVE FROM THE BESIEGED CITY OF ALEPPO, SYRIA!
Released on Aug 3, 2016

Click this link to hear the interview:
https://directory.libsyn.com/episode/index/show/seankentpodcast/id/4562786

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CJ talks to Tauqir Sharif who is in Aleppo right now. Tariq is a British aid worker who isproviding desperate humanitarian relief to Syrians trapped in the besieged city of Aleppo.

Sharif speaks to CJ about the dire situation, the failure of Western governments to provide assistance and why the British government considers him a likely terroris

Talkin’ ‘Merica – the weekly podcast where we get all up in American politics while still making it funny. Listen to us and laugh so you don’t throw up while screaming.

THE HOSTS:

Sean Kent is a Texas born, award winning comedian, actor, radio host and television writer. He is one of only three comics ever to win both the San Francisco and Seattle Comedy Competitions., has a Showtime special, three critically acclaimed albums, and most recently starred on his own prime time series on A&E – “Modern Dads”.

CJ Werleman is an Australian author. He has published five books including Crucifying America, The New Atheist Threat, and God Hates You – Hate Him Back. He has written more than 100 columns for Middle East Eye, The Contributor, Salon, The Bangkok Post, and Alternet.

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